Great innovations in print do not have to be prohibitively expensive and reserved for the top-level advertisers. Our examples show that the biggest factor impeding advertisers’ speed of innovation is simply their creativity.

Great innovations in print do not have to be prohibitively expensive and reserved for the top-level advertisers. Recent examples such as Eneco smart DM, and Kingdom of Sports’ power paper, show that the biggest factor impeding advertisers’ speed of innovation is simply their creativity. Below, we present three examples of fresh creativity put straight into making. 

  • Paper to chill your beer Ogilvy Brasil developed a print ad for Brazilian beer brand, Glacial, that functioned as a bottle chiller. The recipient could simply tear out the page, soak it in water, wrap it around a beer bottle and put it in the fridge. Because the paper contained salt particles that reduced the freezing point of water, the beer was chilled faster than normally. Which beer-drinker wouldn’t agree that this is a great innovation? Especially in Brazil.



  • DJ QBert’s Extraterrestria album Sales of vinyl records increased in recent years, and as printed electronics got more sophisticated, the Filipino American turntablist and composer, DQBert in partnership with tech company Novalia, developed the world’s first playable album cover for his album Extraterrestria. Its cover featured a set of working Bluetooth MIDI decks and controls that connected to a smartphone app, allowing the fan to scratch, mix and fade a range of beats and sounds.
 
  • Coca-Cola creative music mailer Coca-Cola Zero, the official sponsor of one of the world’s largest music and entertainment festivals Rock in Rio, launched a special edition of cans, featuring all music styles among its attractions. VIP-Kits were designed containing a full set of Coca-Cola Zero musical cans and were sent to the most influential celebrities in Brazil. The cans in the kit could be scanned with a mobile app, launching playlists from bands playing in the festival. And to make it a complete experience, the agency turned the VIP Kit into a passive acoustic amplifier, making it ready to play the songs at full blast without electricity. Read the full case study here