Behind the mind: How the brain reacts to printed and digital communication – commissioned by PostNord and conducted by Ipsos and Neurons Inc. Using neuroscientific methods, the study measured how the brain actually respond to different types of communication.

Behind the mind: How the brain reacts to printed and digital communication – commissioned by PostNord and conducted by Ipsos and Neurons Inc. 

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Using neuroscientific methods, the study measured how the brain actually respond to different types of communication. The study provides a deeper understanding of the roles that printed and digital communication play in people’s day-to-day life – and offers answers to how effective printed and digital advertising are. The report also investigated how printed and digital advertising work in synergy with each other.

The study is based on actual campaigns from brands such as IKEA, Lindex, Panduro Hobby, ICA, Plantorama and SuperBrugsen (COOP). 200 people participated (100 in Denmark, 100 in Sweden) and the survey was conducted in a domestic environment.

The materials tested were:

  • Printed advertising: Folders and advertising sheets (addressed / unaddressed)
  • Digital advertising: Banners, digital folders and e-mail (Smartphone / Laptop)

Key findings

  • Together, the effect is greater than for printed and digital advertising separately. These results can also apply to the youngest consumer age groups.
  • The best effect is achieved by choosing printed advertising first and following up via digital channels.
  • People can focus more easily on a printed advertisement. In that medium, longer and more detailed messages can be communicated. It also produces more positive emotions for the consumer.
  • Digital advertising generates more cognitive load, which leads to weaker emotional connection to the brand.
Digital advertising viewed on a SmartPhone creates more emotional response but increases stress, compared to when viewed on a laptop.

Access the full report here.

BTM